Tag Archives: Fiji

The Future Looks Good: The Quest Continues

I’ve been ready to leave Fiji days ago.

I chilled out way too much. I didn’t think that was even possible?

Most of my core group of volunteers were gone and my students wore me the hell out over the past couple weeks. I’m telling you, handling 47 individual eleven and twelve-year-old kids was not an easy task whatsoever.

Though curbing to them was a challenge that ultimately reaped benefits. I’ll be leaving Suva as a much more proficient teacher thanks to my students. They taught me just as much as I taught them. I bet they have no idea about that. I was ready to leave Fiji, but the only reason I would stay longer would be to teach them more.

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On my final few days, class 601 threw me a special party, thanking me for taking the time to help them learn. I appreciated them and the main teacher, Mrs.Kurisaqila, for entrusting me on my own numerous times to handle the kids for sometimes close to seven hours straight in a single day.

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On those long days, I taught English vocabulary, Mathematics, Geography (my best subject by leaps and bounds), and a mixture of Sciences, Art, and Logical Thinking (a subject I created for them). The general consensus was that they liked the logic puzzles I threw at them the most because it inspired them to “think outside the box”. They particularly loved the Price is Right style game I introduced which brilliantly blended mathematics and economics along with some neat prizes to win along the way.

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Saying goodbye to the students is always a lot harder than saying goodbye to the volunteers. Odds are that I’ll never see them again.

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The volunteers on the other hand, they were a really amusing bunch. It took a little longer than usual to warm up to them, except for one in particular; a legend by the name of Hamish. He hails from Sydney and is the quintessential Australian I’ve ever met in all my travels and has a great lease on life. He’s become a good friend of mine and someone you’ll be hearing from later on this blog in just a few months. After I told him about some of the cool places I plan on going to during my quest for the seven continents, there was no way he could resist to join in for at least a chunk of it.

The majority of the other volunteers were also a pleasure to be around. There are way too many to name but they made my trip to Fiji extra special. They know who they are! I plan on visiting a handful of them during my quest to the seven continents. Two of them even share my home state of Michigan.

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I spent the last couple of days lounging around, saying my farewells and “see you laters” to the coordinators and my fellow housemates. I eventually hit the road, about a four-hour bus journey across the island from Suva to Nadi. I stayed in a 16-bed dorm in a cheap hostel near the airport. Normally I would NEVER stay in a dorm with that many beds, but since I was only there for the night, I thought I’d be able to manage.

While I was in the room, a nameless backpacker laid his bag on the bed next to mine. We didn’t introduce ourselves but made quick chit-chat about where we were from and where we were headed. He had just come from Australia and was about to begin a trip through the Fiji islands. I mentioned to him that I was on my way to Australia to backpack all around the country. He then pulled his wallet out of his back pocket and handed me three individual cards.

“You can use these on your travels in Australia,” he said. “I won’t need these anymore.”

I examined the cards and saw that they were city cards used for transportation via train or bus in Australia. One card was for Brisbane, one for Sydney, and the other for Melbourne; three of the largest cities in the country. All of the cards were loaded with a little leftover money the nameless backpacker didn’t use. I thanked him promptly.

The dorm full of 16 backpackers, including myself, fell asleep silent. Not a single person snored or made disruptive noise during the night; an absolute rarity in the world of backpacking, especially in a room as large and filled as this one.

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My time in Fiji ended on a wonderful note. My teaching game has grown stronger, my network of international allies has strengthened, and this nameless backpacker already made my upcoming travels in Australia that much easier, even as simple as his gesture was, it will help in the most convenient ways.

Goodbye Fiji. The quest to the seven continents continues in Australia. 🙂

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Things I Love (and Didn't Quite Love) About Fiji

I’ve been in Fiji for a few weeks now and I can safely say that when you come to this tropical island paradise, expect to chill like you’ve never chilled out before. Fiji’s got the whole relaxin’ thing down!

The Things I Loved:

The People Are Refreshingly Friendly

Not a day went by where I didn’t receive a welcoming “Bula” greeting from a local as I strolled by them. Armed with cordial head nods, big islander style smiles, and cool Fijian handshakes, it’s easy to strike up a good conversation with anyone on the streets. I found that many wished to learn about me and were interested in my thoughts about their country. I also came here thinking I would get heckled and hassled to buy things on the streets like in many countries, but not here. They left me alone in that regard for the most part. Fiji, you are friendly.

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World Renowned Shark Scuba Diving

I went shark diving in Fiji, not once but twice! Both times near Beqa Island, one of the most renowned and sharkiest places in the world to spot a whole range of beasts from the elusive tiger ones to the motley crew of bull sharks. Scuba diving has always been one of my favorite activities, but scuba diving with sharks upped the ante quite a bit. If you are an avid diver, I highly recommend you check it out.

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Those Rotis and the Samosas

The local delicacy in Fiji didn’t really jump out at me. As a matter of fact, there is a heavy Indian influence on the cuisine, specifically in the capital of Suva. However, I did come across two glutton heavy, savory morsels straight outta heaven–rotis and samosas. The version of a roti I had is a concoction of warm potato chunks and minced veggies wrapped in a thick floury dough, lightly fried. A samosa is similar but smaller, kind of like a pizza roll but in a triangular shape and baked. It’s the perfect snack, breakfast, brunch, dinner, and lunch. I’m not sure if these are strictly “Fijian” foods, but you can certainly find them almost anywhere on the main island.

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Put the potato curry inside the roti bread and then you’ll find yourself in a tasty heaven.
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Samosas. Photo courtesy of Asiancuisine.com

The Beach-side (Budget) Resorts

Not the expensive ones, I’m sure they’re nice, but I’m talking about the budget ones like Fiji Beachouse and Uprising, both located along the coral coast far AWAY from the backpacker heavy party hostels in Nadi. I’ve been to a whole bunch of resorts during my time in Fiji and do you know what the main theme is at these resorts? Chill the heck out! Really, it was just pool, beach, billiards, hammocks, beanbags and booze. What more could you want?

fiji beachouse

It’s Relatively Cheap

I was a straight up baller in Fiji. The US dollar equaled about two Fijian dollars, but still most things were cheaply priced (aside from the excursions). Opt for the bus ride that costs less than $10 USD to get from one side of the island to the other. Accommodation was popularly priced and the food and beverages were easy on the wallet. Just stay away from the western restaurants, bars, and the chummy resorts and you’ll find the dollar stretches quite far. We found a bar where you could buy-one-get-one free of absolutely anything you ever wanted! Two pitchers of beer for $5 USD? Sold! By the way, the bar with the BOGO is called Traps. Go there for Ladies Night on Wednesdays.

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Kava Ceremonies

I ranted on a previous post about how much I disliked the taste of kava. Despite the stolid taste, the kava gatherings were simply something I’ve never experienced before. It’s entirely social, where groups of people sit cross-legged on mats laid out on the floor with everyone drinking kava out of a single wooden bowl. Each person that takes a drink receives a quick burst of attention filled with double claps and “Bulas”! The locals pride themselves on sharing the experience with foreigners such as myself and will never hesitate an opportunity to gather around to drink kava with their family and friends. Literally you just sit there, converse a bit, and drink kava. It’s pretty neat!

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The Buses With the Music

Whatever country I’m in, taking the local bus into town is typically flat and ho hum. Usually nothing special. However, every single freakin’ city bus that I rode in Fiji played funky tropical island beats that made me kinda sorta look forward to the ride. From reggae, to island remixes of modern songs, to zippy numbers I’ve never heard of in my life, the music was always bumpin’ and on point. So much that a good portion of those songs are now on a custom Fiji playlist on my iPhone, thanks to the Shazam app. These tunes will forever and always remind me of my chilled out time in Fiji and of all those awesome people I met.

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And then there’s the opposite end of the spectrum…

Things I Didn’t Quite Love

Lack of Diverse Activities

If you ask some of my Fiji housemates, they will tell you that I was consistently bored out of my mind. Besides beaching and diving, there is barely anything else to do! Yes there is white water rafting, zipling, sky diving, but it’s either complete crap, ridiculously expensive or both. There is surfing too I suppose but it’s not really my thing anymore. With Fiji, you’re trapped on a small island with no where else to go. Yes you could go island hopping to do more beaching and boozing but I already beached and boozed a hundred times over on the main island. Now I have to pay $150 for a boat to take me to another island to do the exact same thing? No thanks. Make sure you have your Kindle ready for Fiji.

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Bored…Photo courtesy of Joshua Smith

 

Lack of Beer Choices

You have two choices of beer in Fiji: Fiji Gold or Fiji Bitter. There’s also usually some random third choice and then a handful of imported beer that I can get back in the States. Fiji is not the place to try local brews because they only got two…maybe three. By the way, don’t let the name fool you, Fiji Bitter is so much better than Gold.

Resorts Lost My Reservations ALL THE F*C%ING TIME

Here’s the best piece of advice I can give you if you ever decide to visit Fiji. If you book ANY accommodation here, even if you get your confirmation email, call them to make sure they have your reservation because not once, not twice, not even three, but four freakin’ times I showed up to a resort to find out they “never” received my reservation. Even when I proceeded to show them the confirmation email on my phone, there was still “nothing” they could do about it. Fortunately, most of the times they were able to re-book me except for one instance where we had to find another more expensive accommodation because everything else nearby was already booked. That was SO annoying.

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This is us after battling two different hostels/hotels for our reservations and finally finding a place to crash.

“Fiji Time”

There’s this thing on the island called “Fiji Time”. Basically, if anyone (specifically Fijian locals) is late for anything, instead of blaming it on their lack of punctuality, they can usually get away with it by the excuse of simply saying “Fiji Time”. Fiji time is basically a way of saying that you were so entranced with the chilled out vibes of the island, that the importance of time became second fiddle to the sensation of island style relaxation and hanging loose. “Where’s the bus that was supposed to be here at four?” Oh sorry, Fiji time. “Where is the main teacher for this class because I can’t handle 47 kids by myself?” Oh sorry brutha, Fiji Time. “Where’s the meal I ordered like an hour ago?” Oh, Fiji time.  Most of the people I was with kinda enjoyed the concept of Fiji Time. As for me, I absolutely hate being late for stuff…so it was something I had to accept and get used to.

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Besides all of that, I’ve built a couple solid friendships during my stay in Fiji and I’m sure you’ll be hearing more about them soon on here. I’d have more to report about Fiji but there is only so much I could write about when it comes to sittin’ on the beach and drinking a beer.

The island life. 🙂

Things I Love (and Didn’t Quite Love) About Fiji

I’ve been in Fiji for a few weeks now and I can safely say that when you come to this tropical island paradise, expect to chill like you’ve never chilled out before. Fiji’s got the whole relaxin’ thing down!

The Things I Loved:

The People Are Refreshingly Friendly

Not a day went by where I didn’t receive a welcoming “Bula” greeting from a local as I strolled by them. Armed with cordial head nods, big islander style smiles, and cool Fijian handshakes, it’s easy to strike up a good conversation with anyone on the streets. I found that many wished to learn about me and were interested in my thoughts about their country. I also came here thinking I would get heckled and hassled to buy things on the streets like in many countries, but not here. They left me alone in that regard for the most part. Fiji, you are friendly.

IMG_2840.jpg

World Renowned Shark Scuba Diving

I went shark diving in Fiji, not once but twice! Both times near Beqa Island, one of the most renowned and sharkiest places in the world to spot a whole range of beasts from the elusive tiger ones to the motley crew of bull sharks. Scuba diving has always been one of my favorite activities, but scuba diving with sharks upped the ante quite a bit. If you are an avid diver, I highly recommend you check it out.

FullSizeRender 51.jpg

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Those Rotis and the Samosas

The local delicacy in Fiji didn’t really jump out at me. As a matter of fact, there is a heavy Indian influence on the cuisine, specifically in the capital of Suva. However, I did come across two glutton heavy, savory morsels straight outta heaven–rotis and samosas. The version of a roti I had is a concoction of warm potato chunks and minced veggies wrapped in a thick floury dough, lightly fried. A samosa is similar but smaller, kind of like a pizza roll but in a triangular shape and baked. It’s the perfect snack, breakfast, brunch, dinner, and lunch. I’m not sure if these are strictly “Fijian” foods, but you can certainly find them almost anywhere on the main island.

JTaQ6IgeQwG0MY6cjO2g_1415850927098.jpg
Put the potato curry inside the roti bread and then you’ll find yourself in a tasty heaven.
d7095a0fcac3441a17b135cf712a5f73.jpg
Samosas. Photo courtesy of Asiancuisine.com

The Beach-side (Budget) Resorts

Not the expensive ones, I’m sure they’re nice, but I’m talking about the budget ones like Fiji Beachouse and Uprising, both located along the coral coast far AWAY from the backpacker heavy party hostels in Nadi. I’ve been to a whole bunch of resorts during my time in Fiji and do you know what the main theme is at these resorts? Chill the heck out! Really, it was just pool, beach, billiards, hammocks, beanbags and booze. What more could you want?

fiji beachouse

It’s Relatively Cheap

I was a straight up baller in Fiji. The US dollar equaled about two Fijian dollars, but still most things were cheaply priced (aside from the excursions). Opt for the bus ride that costs less than $10 USD to get from one side of the island to the other. Accommodation was popularly priced and the food and beverages were easy on the wallet. Just stay away from the western restaurants, bars, and the chummy resorts and you’ll find the dollar stretches quite far. We found a bar where you could buy-one-get-one free of absolutely anything you ever wanted! Two pitchers of beer for $5 USD? Sold! By the way, the bar with the BOGO is called Traps. Go there for Ladies Night on Wednesdays.

IMG_0097.jpg

Kava Ceremonies

I ranted on a previous post about how much I disliked the taste of kava. Despite the stolid taste, the kava gatherings were simply something I’ve never experienced before. It’s entirely social, where groups of people sit cross-legged on mats laid out on the floor with everyone drinking kava out of a single wooden bowl. Each person that takes a drink receives a quick burst of attention filled with double claps and “Bulas”! The locals pride themselves on sharing the experience with foreigners such as myself and will never hesitate an opportunity to gather around to drink kava with their family and friends. Literally you just sit there, converse a bit, and drink kava. It’s pretty neat!

IMG_1473.jpg

The Buses With the Music

Whatever country I’m in, taking the local bus into town is typically flat and ho hum. Usually nothing special. However, every single freakin’ city bus that I rode in Fiji played funky tropical island beats that made me kinda sorta look forward to the ride. From reggae, to island remixes of modern songs, to zippy numbers I’ve never heard of in my life, the music was always bumpin’ and on point. So much that a good portion of those songs are now on a custom Fiji playlist on my iPhone, thanks to the Shazam app. These tunes will forever and always remind me of my chilled out time in Fiji and of all those awesome people I met.

fiji local buses

And then there’s the opposite end of the spectrum…

Things I Didn’t Quite Love

Lack of Diverse Activities

If you ask some of my Fiji housemates, they will tell you that I was consistently bored out of my mind. Besides beaching and diving, there is barely anything else to do! Yes there is white water rafting, zipling, sky diving, but it’s either complete crap, ridiculously expensive or both. There is surfing too I suppose but it’s not really my thing anymore. With Fiji, you’re trapped on a small island with no where else to go. Yes you could go island hopping to do more beaching and boozing but I already beached and boozed a hundred times over on the main island. Now I have to pay $150 for a boat to take me to another island to do the exact same thing? No thanks. Make sure you have your Kindle ready for Fiji.

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Bored…Photo courtesy of Joshua Smith

 

Lack of Beer Choices

You have two choices of beer in Fiji: Fiji Gold or Fiji Bitter. There’s also usually some random third choice and then a handful of imported beer that I can get back in the States. Fiji is not the place to try local brews because they only got two…maybe three. By the way, don’t let the name fool you, Fiji Bitter is so much better than Gold.

Resorts Lost My Reservations ALL THE F*C%ING TIME

Here’s the best piece of advice I can give you if you ever decide to visit Fiji. If you book ANY accommodation here, even if you get your confirmation email, call them to make sure they have your reservation because not once, not twice, not even three, but four freakin’ times I showed up to a resort to find out they “never” received my reservation. Even when I proceeded to show them the confirmation email on my phone, there was still “nothing” they could do about it. Fortunately, most of the times they were able to re-book me except for one instance where we had to find another more expensive accommodation because everything else nearby was already booked. That was SO annoying.

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This is us after battling two different hostels/hotels for our reservations and finally finding a place to crash.

“Fiji Time”

There’s this thing on the island called “Fiji Time”. Basically, if anyone (specifically Fijian locals) is late for anything, instead of blaming it on their lack of punctuality, they can usually get away with it by the excuse of simply saying “Fiji Time”. Fiji time is basically a way of saying that you were so entranced with the chilled out vibes of the island, that the importance of time became second fiddle to the sensation of island style relaxation and hanging loose. “Where’s the bus that was supposed to be here at four?” Oh sorry, Fiji time. “Where is the main teacher for this class because I can’t handle 47 kids by myself?” Oh sorry brutha, Fiji Time. “Where’s the meal I ordered like an hour ago?” Oh, Fiji time.  Most of the people I was with kinda enjoyed the concept of Fiji Time. As for me, I absolutely hate being late for stuff…so it was something I had to accept and get used to.

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Besides all of that, I’ve built a couple solid friendships during my stay in Fiji and I’m sure you’ll be hearing more about them soon on here. I’d have more to report about Fiji but there is only so much I could write about when it comes to sittin’ on the beach and drinking a beer.

The island life. 🙂

How I Avoided a Complete Disaster of Traveling With My Non-Traveling Friends

It was bound to happen and I knew it would.

#byefelicia
#byefelicia
I tried my best to prevent it but it was inevitable. A rift formed in my group of New Zealand companions. It was mainly me vs. the other two, with Ryan spectating from the sides.

Traveling with people who travel often is WORLDS different than traveling with people who never or rarely do so. I will always prefer to go about it alone, meeting people along the way. With my intentions to go to New Zealand, I assumed I would once again go solo. It’s been my thing for years and it’s always worked extremely well. Still, I always wished for my friends back home to experience what I experienced, because talking about it and showing them pictures doesn’t express any justice. You just had to be there. The way Chelsey, Ryan, and Mike came about to join me in New Zealand was spur of the moment random and super spontaneous. I’m actually a bit picky about who I will let accompany me because traveling across the world unleashes a never-before-seen side to my American friends that I didn’t want to risk seeing. However, having them join me would test my desire of having my friends getting a taste of the globetrotting life I led. They were joining me on my trip, which they were well aware of. “We are following you Dan,” is what they would tell me, but I knew it wouldn’t turn out that way. This was now our trip. Now that everything is said and done, I can safely say it was an overall success.

Remember how naive and stupid you were when you first began traveling, Daniel. I always kept that in the back of my head.

Here is how I avoided a complete blunder of traveling with my non-traveling friends:

1. Create A Plan So Everyone Is On The Same Page

To avoid most disputes, I was pretty darn careful about our plan for our New Zealand/Fiji trip. The first issue was the actual plan. Those who really know me, know that I don’t really plan ahead for my backpacking trips, I just go with the flow. Take a look at my recent backpacking trip I like to call The Unplanned Plan. I had no idea where the heck I was going! However, I know many people are uncomfortable with the idea of the unknown and so with my non-traveling comrades, I formulated with them a rough draft to keep everyone on the same page which worked well. The only issue I had was that for the most part, my comrades have given little input to the plan I suggested and were basically game for anything. I was happy about this but also worried at the same time that I would fall into the chaperone role. I knew that once we got to New Zealand is when they would begin suggesting things they would want to do.

2. Discuss How Money Will Be Dealt With BEFORE Departure

Money is one of the the biggest issues that cause disagreements while traveling with friends. I’ve had to separate from fellow backpackers because our budgets were just too different. Thankfully with this group, money wasn’t a huge deal. I trusted them enough to offer to put the majority of our group expenses on my foreign transaction-free credit card and then have everyone PayPal what they owed me at the end. This worked very well but it took a lot of effort on my part. I had to retain every receipt we acquired on our trip (food, lodging, splitting gas, etc) in a neat folder to sort out at the end. Then, I created an excel spreadsheet of what everyone owed me once we arrived in Fiji. PayPal made it simple and easy via the apps on our phones. The problem lies in the trust issue. Thankfully, I had the fortune of being able to fully trust my comrades as far as money was concerned and everything worked out great at the end. They all paid me back promptly too!

This is part of the spreadsheet I created to keep tabs on everyone's individual expenses. This worked out so good!
This is part of the spreadsheet I created to keep tabs on everyone’s individual expenses. This worked out so good!

3. Never Make a Decision Without the Approval of Everyone Else in the Group

I was particularly careful about this one. Of course everyone is gonna want to do something different. Like how everyone wished to visit Hobbiton and I didn’t want to at all. There will be times when majority of the group wants to do something the other wants to do and in those cases, majority rules. I was perfectly fine sitting out and catching up on writing. Same goes for food. We all had different appetites, but still I always let them decide what we ate if we couldn’t help it. We couldn’t really separate because we were in the middle of nowhere with one car. No big deal though. Thankfully everything I suggested we do, the others were down with. Same goes for Chelsey suggesting Paihia and Mike suggesting Tongariro. We didn’t really have an issue in this matter. So far so good!

4. Make Time to Separate and Do Your Own Thing

By the time we reached Wellington, my group began to feel suffocated from being around each other 24/7. We’ve been bound at the hip since Auckland and now that we had a few days in Wellington with no plan, we found time to explore at our own accord. Mike was able to get a couple CrossFit sessions in, Chelsey explored the local zoo and museums at her leisure, while Ryan and I practically won a beer pong tournament (it came down to rock-paper-scissors in which we lost) at a local bar. Wellington was very much needed. Wellington was also where I addressed an underlying issue within the group.

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5. Be Open About an Issue Before it Grows into Something Bigger

I always had the mindset to have a group discussion if I noticed things getting sour between the four of us. Well things were getting sour, and so once I had the others attention, I revealed the elephant in the room. I can tell what the issue was without even asking, Mike and Chelsey believe I am too controlling. Why would they think that? Well for one, I wouldn never let them drive and secondly, I would rush them a bit when they were lallygagging. Why wouldn’t I let them drive? There’s good reason. When I rented this car, I picked it up with full coverage added on just in case anything happened to the vehicle, we’re completely covered. However, that full coverage would have been void if anyone else drove besides the driver who signed and picked up the car (me). Mike and Chelsey never drove on the left side of the road before and really wanted to try it which was understandable, after all they did each pay for a quarter of the costs. But I couldn’t risk paying hard earned money for something completely avoidable just because they wanted to try it out. At the end of the day, I let both of them drive when we were on long stretches of road with barely any traffic. Honestly, it was like appeasing the little kid who wanted to ride the big kid ride.

As for being rushy, at times I had to be. We only had two full weeks to explore New Zealand which is nowhere near enough time. I originally wanted to do a month or two but had to cut it down to two weeks once they tagged along. With that in mind, I know there will be plenty of opportunity for me to return on my own and do my own thing, but for them not so much. It was my effort to have them see as much as they could in the most efficient way as possible to get the most out of their trip. During instances when they were loafing or suggesting something that I knew was unfavorable for timing standards, I had to shut them down no question. When I explained it to them, they understood. At the end of the day, we were never late for anything.

I made it clear to them what my intentions were. My intended trip of backpacking New Zealand solo turned into a trip for me to make sure they had an action packed two weeks for as cost effective as possible. I think I succeeded on that note too with everyone remaining under their budgets. I’ve done trips like these a zillion times, so I just needed them to trust me more. Once we were done with our pow wow and everyone said their peace, we all were on great terms for the remainder of the trip.

Crisis averted!

Processed with Snapseed.

Onward to Fiji!

In addition to the two week trip in New Zealand, the four of us also planned about four days in Fiji before they go back home to Michigan and I continue on my own. I reserved us dorm beds at the Fiji Beachouse, one of the most highly rated budget accommodations on the main island. Instead of the backpacker infested hostels in Nadi, I thought the Fiji Beachouse, located about three hours away from the hustle and bustle, would fit the vibe more…and it certainly did. This place was amazing!

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As soon as I walked through the premises, I truly felt like my solo trip has begun. I didn’t have to drive anywhere, I didn’t have to split costs with anyone, I didn’t have to do a damn thing but relax my butt off before I move deeper into the country…solo! (Never quite solo, I’m always with people I meet along the way.) The Fiji Beachouse did have its share of backpackers though. A few of them we befriended and ending up on a few small excursions close by the Beachouse.

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I met some locals when my New Zealand crew were on one of those excursions, who invited me over for Kava. The experience was so unique and authentic, that I brought over my crew and a few backpackers the next day to experience it as well.

Would I Travel With Non-Travelers Again?

The day has come for Chelsey, Mike, and Ryan to finally head back to the USA. We’ve been together for nearly three weeks all over the North Island of New Zealand and the Fiji Beachouse with memories that will stick with us forever. Thankfully, I had a solid group with me because I’ve met other travelers on the road who haven’t been so lucky.

When they packed and waited near the bus stand to go to the airport, I actually missed their departure because I was in the middle of eating lunch and the bus came a lot earlier than I expected. When I ran to the bus station to say my goodbyes to them, they were already gone.

Alright, here's a better photo.
Alright, here’s a better photo.
So would I travel with friends from home again? Specifically the Non-Traveling ones? Ummmm, perhaps but maybe one at a time, not three at once. Surprisingly, if I could travel with Chelsey, Mike, and Ryan again, I would do it individually, not as a group. I’ve learned their separate styles and am able to adapt better when one on one. Mike is an adventurer and is super keen on taken the unbeaten path. Chelsey is a wanderlust, which means she is very fond of meeting other travelers and taking their advice to find the next best thing. Ryan is a go-with-the-flow kind of guy. If he’s part of a group, he’s just happy to be along for the ride.  Regardless, I learned a whole lot from the experience. If anything, I found that I would make a fantastic tour guide (something I never want to do as a profession).

With the three away, it was time to begin the rest of my journey on my own accord. And let me tell you, within a couple of days of being in Fiji, I already found myself at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean surrounded by sixteen massive bull sharks. Literally.

Let me explain…