Tag Archives: Adventure

Top 10 Moments From My Quest to the Seven Continents

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I began and ended this quest in ice…

…from the Arctic north of Alaska to the frozen continent of Antarctica. In between the two poles, I largely ventured in warm, subtropical climates. From the East to the West, the journey from the oceanic islands of the South Pacific all the way through across the Atlantic to the eastern coast of South America was enlightening, spur-of-the-moment, and the most adventurous of all my tales.

After a little more than a year and a half of constant travel, I successfully completed my Quest to the Seven Continents: North America, Oceania (Australia), Asia, Europe, Africa, South America, & Antarctica.

These are the TOP 10 Greatest Moments from that journey around the world. 

 From August 2016—February 2018

#11. Celebrating New Year’s Eve in Rio de Janeiro  (Honorable Mention).

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I had to include this as an honorable mention because it was just so damn special. Attending New Year’s Eve on the exotic beaches of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil has been on my ATLAS (bucket list) for years and for good reason; it was truly something remarkable. Coming off the worst hangover of my life (lasting two days!) with a bunch of party-hard backpackers and insane Brazilian locals—I donned in mostly white attire and got silly again with them on on the eve of the New Year. I stood in the shimmering ocean as fireworks were booming and each jump over an incoming wave signaled all the best luck heading into 2018. I was sandy, soaking wet, and buzzed, but on a personal high I haven’t experienced in a long while. Rio delivered to the quest.

(I have yet to publish a post about this moment. Look out for it soon!)

#10. The Gift on the Great Ocean Road

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Some of the best moments are the unexpected ones. A few years ago while backpacking through Laos, I met an Australian traveler by the name of Alison who taught me how to ride a motorbike for the first time. Fast forward to November 2017, I still haven’t seen her since. Knowing she lived on the East Coast of Australia, I contacted her and asked if she was around to reunite for a bit. Unfortunately, she was working on assignment in the Middle East.

However.

Completely out of nowhere, she offered her entire home to me while she was away and encouraged me to bring my friends. It was a vacation style house, an utterly perfect luxury abode sitting right at the start of Australia’s Great Ocean Road. I graciously accepted her generous offer, heeded her advice, and invited a handpicked selection of trusted friends who were around the area along. To say our weekend there was a blast would be an understatement. Even more amazing, was the fact that this woman, Alison, whom I’ve only met once in a random country years ago, trusted me with her home. I took great care of it and still plan to one day return the very generous favor to her in some way. This was a very unexpected, yet appreciated compliment to my quest.

 

#9. Diving With Bull Sharks

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The only thing I wanted to do in Fiji was scuba dive with bull sharks. I got the opportunity on my first day there when a group of scuba divers at a beach house I was staying at randomly asked if I wanted to join on a shark dive the next day. What luck! You would think seeing a gang of ferocious sharks underwater, just a few meters away from you would be terrifying, but not in this case. It was thoroughly mesmerizing in every way. I did three more shark dives in Fiji after that one. One of my most desired travel dreams was accomplished very early in the quest.

 

#8. Finding A Needle In a Haystack (My Lost Passport in Ukraine)

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This can also count as one of my most tense moments during the quest. The lengths I went through to find my lost passport to get out of Ukraine is nothing I will ever just shrug off. The complete language barrier, the bizarre police rides, the mysterious messages from Russian women, the apartment complex puzzle-solving, and of course, the shady man in the trench coat who tried to kidnap me in his alleyway vehicle…I still give myself a gratifying pat on the back for a triumphant ending. When I nearly gave up hope, I miraculously found my passport and was able to leave Ukraine in the nick of time. This quest was not without its trials and this is one unforgettable example of that.

 

#7. Summiting Annapurna Basecamp

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The Himalayas are perhaps the most fearsome mountain range in the world and I wanted to trek it. Not Mount Everest though, I’m not ready for that yet. Instead, I opted for its smaller-scale neighbor, Annapurna Basecamp. A buddy and I trekked up through vivid scenery for nine days until we peaked at 4,190 meters in the cool snow with relative ease. Annapurna Basecamp is the second highest climb I’ve ever done (Kilimanjaro is the first) and the highest summit I’ve conquered on this particular quest.

 

#6. Lost in Indian Mountains During Christmas

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I was sitting in a hostel in Mumbai minding my own business until a local Indian man came up to me and asked if I wanted to hike Fort Torne with him and his friend on Christmas Eve, which was just a day later. I gave an immediate “yes”. Fort Torne was a small mountain range just a few hours bus-ride east of Mumbai where tourists don’t usually go. We left late in the evening and had to sleep on the concrete floor in a small temple at the base of the mountain to avoid wild leopards during their primal hours. We got lost in the pitch black during the hike up which resulted in us sleeping on a random villager’s stack of hay we stumbled across, alongside a stray dog who kept us company the entire night; all while keeping watch of any looming leopards. The next morning, we found our way through Fort Torne. I wanted to do something unique for Christmas, but never could I have expected this. This would have been my favorite Christmas ever, but the Christmas of 1998 still reigns supreme—the year I received a Nintendo 64.

 

#5. Sparking The Most Colorful War On Sarangkot Mountain

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I just so happened to be in Nepal during their Holi Festival. A holiday where everyone celebrates life by throwing colored powder at each other among other traditions like shooting water guns and lobbing water balloons at everyone. Once I found this out, the child in me came all out. I bought a ridiculous amount of colors and water guns, bazookas, balloons, and even silly string and snow spray. I was completely ready to wreak the most colorful havoc on my village and they were prepared as well. It was me versus nearly the entire lot of kids in the area in what was the most polychromatic, rainbow war that I’ll ever participate in…at least until next time when I exact revenge. They completely destroyed me. On that day, Holi Festival became one of my new favorite holidays I was fortunate to experience for the first time ever during this quest.

 

#4. Walking 500 Miles Across Spain

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A friend in Manchester told me about El Camino de Santiago; an 800-kilometer pilgrimage from the France border across most of northern Spain. Many do it for religious reasons. Others do it to find themselves. I did it solely for the challenge. On the way, I met an eclectic range of personalities while walking through whatever the camino threw at me: villages, mountains, highways, forests, cities, farms, grasslands, and the nefarious Meseta region, a hot and dry portion that required all of my mental prowess all while eating rock-hard bocadillos every single day. I completed the camino in 32 days along with the group I met along the way. It was a gracious feeling knowing I could achieve such a major accomplishment to close out the European portion of the quest.

 

#3. Creating The League of Extraordinary Events

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The idea of removing three of my American friends from their normal everyday lives and throwing them into one of the biggest unexpected twists of their lives sounded like complete brilliance. For months, they were certain I was taking them on a special road trip down to Florida. Instead, I pulled the rug right from under their feet by flying them out to Alaska and then immediately to Hawaii to participate in eight extraordinary events and activities I’ve been planning for months. Little did they know that the unknown events involved sharks, icebergs, mountains, booze, ATV’s, rapids, oceans, and so much more. This extraordinary feat kicked off my quest around the world.

 

#2. Voyage To Antarctica

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Learning how to sail the Europa, a tall Dutch ship across the infamous Drake’s Passage into the icy wonderland that is Antarctica is arguably my greatest adventure of all time! I’ll never forget stepping foot onto the continent for the very first time, completing the short, yet arduous list of the world’s seven. Over the span of 22 days, I learned the basics of sailing and became a crew member for the Bark Europa vessel. Add on the abundance of wildlife, mountainous glaciers, icebergs taller than skyscrapers, the nights of unavoidable sea seasickness, and the natural beauty beheld…the voyage to Antarctica was truly the ultimate pinnacle of my entire quest.

(I have yet to publish a post about this moment. Look out for it soon!)

 

#1. Nepal

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It was the most heartwarming decision I made on this quest.

The only reason I went back was to fulfill a promise I made two years ago to the class nine students; to take them on a field trip, fully funded by me. If it weren’t for that sole purpose, I probably would have never returned, but I’m so glad I did.

I kept that promise and took that same class, plus a couple other classes on a special trip, but what I didn’t expect was to gain a family while I stayed in the villages in Sarangkot Mountain. I got to know my host families much better this time around and in the process created an unbreakable bond with the people there. I gained a few new “brothers” and never once did I feel like a tourist. I stayed for three months, much longer than I anticipated, and even returned for two more months, just a short time later. I felt completely at peace.

The family foremost culture in Nepal is something I don’t really have back home, I hate to admit.  I always think about the country and how it’s now one of my absolute most favorite places in the world. I already am looking forward to my near future trips to see my “family” and friends there once again. My newfound love for Nepal was the best gift this quest presented me.


 

Here are some other interesting numbers:

-I visited 26 countries during this quest. Not including airport layovers and transfers. 8 of them are ones I’ve been to before.

-I spent the most time in Nepal (5 months total), which also means I spent the longest time in Asia out of all the continents.

-Not counting being home, I spent the shortest amount of time in North America out of all the continents.

-The longest consecutive time I went without any internet is 22 days.

-I flew on 36 different flights around the world (not yet counting the ones taking me back to Michigan)

-I spent 35 consecutive days without eating meat.

-Out of all of my travels, I’ve been sick the least amount of times during this trip. Only a 24 hour flu and a brief stomach bug. Both occurring in Nepal.

-The absolute worst hangover in my life occurred in Brazil. (Lasted for two days.)

-I learned to say basic phrases in 6 new languages. (Hello, Thank you, Please, Excuse me, etc)

-I held 6 different phone numbers total during this quest.

-I’ve driven a vehicle in 6 countries during the quest. Only one of them was on the right side of the road.

-Around month number 9 is when I first began to feel travel fatigue.

-I always accidentally receive some sort of semi-permanent scar on my body from a trip. With this quest, I came out unscathed.

-I stayed in a total of 104 different hostels, hotels, lodges, and airbnbs. A bulk of this is from the camino in Spain. This doesn’t include homestays, volunteer houses, and friends homes.

-I vomited in 3 different countries during this quest: Poland (intoxicated), Brazil (very intoxicated), and Antarctica (seasickness) (I’m also counting that as a country).

-“Despacito” and “Shape of You” are by far the two most popular songs I’ve heard during most of the quest in many countries.

-The highest altitude (without flying) during this quest was 4,190m (Annapurna).


 

And now my watch quest has ended.

What could possibly be next? I have no clue. But, I still have a bucket list to complete…

 

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Daniel Adventure Born and the Monkey Thieves

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(In case you missed any of the previous Quest posts, click here for the archive of stories since the Quest began in August.)

It’s December.

Month number five into my Quest to the Seven Continents. Still such a long way to go.

This has been my route so far since I left Michigan on the 1st of August, 2016.

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It’s now time to enter Asia, the mythical continent, beginning with a week-long stopover in Bali, Indonesia to visit my friend Sam.

The direct flight from Perth to Bali was easy. Upon arrival, I could feel the warm humidity beginning to stick to my skin. It was familiar and it’s what I expected when being in Southeast Asia.  I gathered my checked luggage, rolled through customs, and found Sam waiting for me at the arrival gates. We took a cab ride to where he resided in Bali, near Sanur.

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The island of Bali, Indonesia. Sam resides where the orange drop pin is located.

He lived in a seemingly peaceful retreat; a hidden community in one of the gangs (alleys) away from the main streets. His abode was at the end of a winding walkway through a garden occupied by buggy critters and toads and a small pool that appeared to be the most refreshing of blues.

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After settling in (and readjusting to the humidity), we took a trip south to get my first taste of Bali in an area of interest called the Garuda Wisnu Kencana Cultural Park, home of the giant mythical humanoid bird monument, Garuda.

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According to Buddhist mythology, Garuda is a powerful deity under the rule of Lord Vishnu. It is a powerful warrior that overpowers its opponents and is known to eat only serpents. In Bali in particular, it has become a symbol of culture and popular amongst craftsmen and artists. This is the largest Garuda statue in the world standing at 18 meters tall and made of copper and brass.

Pretty cool stuff.

The Cultural Park is home to many other statues and monuments as well. They were cool too, but none as redeeming as my pal Garuda.

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Sam teaches during the week and so I had plenty of free time to explore Bali on my own. I spent most of the days lounging, being a lazy bum, but would venture out to specific sites Sam suggested I should see when I felt like it. One of those places he suggested was the Uluwatu Temple, a Balinese Sea Temple in South Kuta.

What was there? I shall soon find out.

I summoned Archyar, a trustworthy taxi driver Sam and I befriended earlier, to take me to Uluwatu. Traffic was thick and hectic, but after about an hour we made it.

The outside of the temple was filled with people; tourists and locals alike. Also, monkeys sneaking around on the high wires and rooftops of the dingy cafe roofs. They appeared to be stealthily scoping out the people walking below them, including myself.

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“What kind of monkeys are these?”

I googled it and found out these monkeys were called long-tailed macaques.

Never heard of ’em.

Google also told me that they are kind of an agricultural pest but protected in holy temples, such as this one in Uluwatu.

A sign posted near the temple’s entrance read, “Watch your belongings!”

Uluwatu Temple is situated along a cliff ridge facing the South Pacific Sea.

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A linear trail takes you through smaller, adjacent temples and shrines and also through a few forests. Heavily dispersed on the path, a bunch of typical selfie spamming tourists, posing for their next Facebook profile picture. Further northward, the presence of macaques grew and their antics were attracting the curiosity of the tourists.

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I held my gear close. I didn’t have anything loose on me for them to try and nab. Only my phone in my pocket and my heavy Canon DSLR. I wasn’t wearing flip-flops nor glasses; two common items for them to try and steal. I was useless to the macaques, but many other tourists were ready for prime picking. I witnessed an unsuspecting girl get her lunch sack nabbed right out of her hand. It was a banana and a sandwich in a plastic bag. That macaque opened the bag like a little human and went to town!

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Another woman got her fuzzy blue pouch stolen. The culprit took a few bites out of the fuzz, repeatedly spitting it out in disgust before it realized it wasn’t food, but kept the pouch anyway!

I continued walking along, quite amused by the furry little thieves, popping out of nowhere, getting their tiny little human-like hands on things that didn’t belong to them. If anyone gets anything nabbed, it’s their own fault. As I progressed, the macaques began to quickly outnumber the dwindling number of tourists who mostly mingled near the epicenter of the temple. I walked along the ridge until I noticed a dead-end just about. It was just me and a blockade dominated by macaques.

There must have been a hundred of them along the rail and surrounding, easily!

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I paused for a moment and looked back. There were just a few people a few yards behind me, but they didn’t dare come close to the side taken over by prankish macaques. I had nothing on me they could nab. My DSLR is too bulky for them, so into the bevy I went.

I love monkeys and my desire to be as close to them as possible was strong.

Then I noticed their fangs. Their fangs were ginormous and intimidating as heck!

As I attentively walked into the horde, I looked upon the ones sitting on the ledges to my left. There were macaques of all shapes and sizes, some with fragile ugly baby macaques latched onto their mothers backside, front side, and whatever side. I would get looks but none that presented ill ease from them. Macaques scurried all around me as I walked on, but still none physically tried to bother me.

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One group of macaques had a sandal in their grasp. There’s some unfortunate tourist walking around in the temple with one sandal on.

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I would get some looks from time to time, but it was mostly like I was invisible to the monkeys.

But then, it began to rain.

Almost instinctively I tucked my camera under my shirt and whipped out my somewhat water-resistant iPhone to continue taking photos. I was now vulnerable to thievery. The macaques stared as I fumbled around with my belongings. I took a few more shots and searched for nearby shelter to wait out the rain. The macaques followed suit.

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I found a small shrine with a roof about 30 yards from the dead-end. There were about seven people squeezed sitting underneath protected from the sudden downpour. I squeezed myself in to make eight. The macaques came soon after and began to creep all around the shrine we occupied.

They would leap into our shrine and bare their fangs, scaring the sh*t out of some of the tourist! Look up and there were macaques peering upside down from the roof, which was only a few feet above our heads. I hugged my backpack on my lap and carefully opened it up to secure my canon as a macaque sat next to me. Strangely, they weren’t bothering me but were absolutely terrifying the life out of some of these other tourists.

It was pretty hilarious actually.

Now that my camera was safe and secure, I didn’t mind getting wet, so I left the shrine and began to walk back. Many of the tourists who were around had already fled to shelter.

I was alone, with monkeys, while downpouring, in a jungle temple. How sweet!

I was planning on staying for the sunset but the storm clouds completely covered the sky. The rain flushed out more macaques onto the path that I needed to get back to the entrance.

How do I safely get past these guys?

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I simply walked through, careful not to step on any tails. I bet these monkeys had venomous bites like the baboons in Tanzania did. I saw a monkey with a phone in its possession. It wasn’t trying to eat it, it just held onto it as if it were a prize. I continued to stroll on as the horde grew thin.

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The rain halted my temple visit, but I was okay with that. I’ve been “templed out” for a couple of years now and preferably spent more time interested in the macaques than the actual temple and shrines.

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Thank you, long-tailed macaque monkeys, for not messing with me, yet terrorizing everyone else. It was absolutely comical and it made my day!

I phoned Archyar to retrieve me and no later than ten minutes, he showed up. I returned to Sam’s place in Sanur and told him about my time in Uluwatu.

He then told me of a theme park he heard about somewhere in Bali, that Disney used to own but it is now totally abandoned and supposedly haunted. One of the most haunted places in Southeast Asia.

Let’s do it!

A Visit To Tasmania: An Unexpected Wonder

 

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What do I know about Tasmania?

Not a damn thing.

The only thing I do know is that the island is the native home to the most feisty marsupial in the world: the Tasmanian devil. I would love to see some of those guys in the wild if at all possible.

Besides that, some Melburnians jokingly told me to check the necks of any Tassie I meet. They said I should find a huge scar from where their second head used to be attached. The running joke here is that the local  Tassies are inbreeds since they’re all “stuck” more or less on a relatively small island. It’s kinda like how the northerners in the States poke fun at the people in the deep south; harmless and pure buffoonery.

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The 26th largest island in the world, Tasmania is an island state part of the Australian Commonwealth. It’s located just south of the main big island. There currently as of today (2016) just a little over half a million people populating Tas (which is a popular shortening people may refer of the state). I was fortunate enough to cross paths with two very welcoming Tassies early on in my Quest to the Seven Continents.

While in Fiji, I met two volunteers who hailed from Tasmania. Their names are Denika and Karissa, two full-on Aussies, born and raised from Tasmanian scratch. They both invited me to visit them during my trip through Australia when I found the time. At first I was reluctant. It wasn’t on my mind and it’s kind of out of the way, but then I figured, “Why the hell not?”. If anything the timing was perfect, return flights to Tasmania were cheap, the weather for the weekend predicted desirable forecasts, and I knew two cool people who wanted to show me the true guts and bones of Tasmania.

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Karissa on the left. Denika on the right. I think this photo accurately portrays how they are!

Just like that, I booked a flight to Launceston from Melbourne; an easy flight that took just under an hour.

Little Denika arrived and scooped me up from the airport and from there we made the two-hour drive to the northwest part of the island called Burnie. I briefly met her family before we headed to Boat Harbour Beach, one of Denika’s personal favorite spots.

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Later that day, I met up with Karissa near the Parklands. She mentioned to me that she reserved us a table for tea later in the evening.

“Who makes a reservation for tea?” I thought to myself. But hey whatever, I was down for some tea! I’m more hungry than thirsty but I’m sure this tea place had to have some grub.

In the meantime she showed me a little more of the surrounding area. So far from what I’ve seen, the roadsides of Tasmania reminded me of New Zealand; a perfectly cut, grass ocean as far as the eye can see. Oh and lots of cows and crops with mountains and hills in the wayside.

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We pulled up to an Italian restaurant, where we had the reservations for…tea?

“Wait, you guys call dinner, tea?” I asked Karissa. “I thought we were having actual tea.”

“Yeah that’s normal.” she responded laughing. “We are going for tea means food. How would you say it back in America?”

“Dinner!” I replied with a chuckle. “Supper, if you’re a weirdo.”

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That’s not the only difference I noticed. I’ve been hearing Denika say the word “shivers” in substitution for what should be the word “f*ck”. Like for example, something would go wrong and then she would blurt “Oh, shivers!” in her little Aussie accent. I couldn’t help but to laugh whenever she did that.

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Another pretty big thing I noticed is that, everyone knows freakin’ everybody on this island! There’s not a place we went to where Denika and Karissa didn’t know someone. The ice cream shop, the convenient store, the restaurants we ate in, the park, the parking lot, wherever! Living in Tasmania is equivalent to living in the world’s largest soap opera. Everyone is gonna know your business and there’s no hiding from it.

The next day, both girls took me on a short trail just above Sisters Beach. It was a linear hike that presented us with views of the aforementioned beach and of the Indian Ocean.

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During the trail, I noticed strange flora that resembled figments of my childhood. A prickly, pine cone thing that would have been a Furby if it had the googly eyes and also this bush tree thing that resembles a little jungle tribe warrior man. I can’t unsee them.

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Continuing on with my personalized tour of Tasmania, the girls took me to a waterfall in the Crown Reserve and through Stanley to the top of the Nut State Reserve. Amazing, amazing, amazing stuff!

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That same evening, while Denika went to work, Karissa took me to one of the coolest local waterfalls in West Ridgley that people could spend their summer days to swim in. I would have but it wasn’t warm enough yet for it.

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We also managed to find baby penguins back on the Parklands. Don’t shine your lights on them, it’s bad for their eyes. Instead, we were able to use lights with a red filter which don’t startle them. This may be a bit naive on my part but I wasn’t aware that Australia had native penguins. All I hear about are the kangaroos and koalas.

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We had a big weekend planned so for the next day, Karissa baton passed me back to Denika. (They both have steady jobs and have been passing me back and forth to each other to make sure I was always occupied and exploring their great State. They’ve been doing a great job!) With Denika, she had plans to go along the east coast of Tasmania along with a few of her friends and spend the night over there. When she pulled up, I met her friend Jack who was coming along with us, and together we went grocery shopping for the long ride to the East coast. Two other friends of hers met us there and would join us.

The drive was almost exactly like a drive through the country of New Zealand, except it felt like Tasmania had a lot more trees. Along the way, we made a destination stop at Bicheno. A coast influenced by giant orange-colored boulders and a break between conveniently placed crevices of stones where water shoots up through it every few seconds, aptly called the Bicheno Blowhole. I’ve got blown on a couple of times when I wasn’t paying attention.

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Our base was in an area called Swansea. Swansea is home to fascinating places like The Ugly Duckout takeaway restaurant and The Horny Cray takeaway restaurant.

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Swansea is also home to Loontitetermairrelehoiner Track.

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That’s a real thing folks! The reception lady said there was free ice cream for whoever could pronounce it correctly. The key words being FREE ICE CREAM. Believe me, I tried my hardest to figure out how to pronounce it. It was impossible, however.

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Continuing on with our east coast trip, the focus was to visit as many beaches as we could. First up, Friendly Beaches!

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Then this cool spot where we were the only ones there.

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Later onto Freycinet, to a place called Honeymoon Beach. It’s here where the water is so calm and the wildlife so peculiar, that it’s become a popular spot to snorkel.

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Freycinet also hold spectacular lookouts into the sea from various advantages along the coast.

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And then finally, Coles Bay has a postcard worthy lighthouse that overlooks a couple of much smaller islands harbouring seals just a short distance away.

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Did you see how amazing Tasmania actually looks?

Every single one of these locales were absolutely stunning and was the most “nature” I’ve gotten in Australia yet! The only bummer that it was not the right temperature to go for a dip in each of the beaches we visited. Regardless, it was still amazing to visit.

I had no idea Tasmania had such a diverse coastal line to explore. I had no idea about anything! It was literally one neat spot after another after another.

I gotta hand it to Denika and Karissa. They went way above and beyond to show me as much as they could in as little time as possible. A+ ladies 🙂

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See ya back in Melbourne!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hangin’ Out In Long Beach, NY: Preparing For A Global Expedition

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Hello world!

I’m writing this at a friend’s apartment right on the oceanfront of Long Beach, New York. It’s the perfect spot to settle and unwind away from the busier neighboring Burroughs of Brooklyn and Manhattan. I’m here for the simple reason of seeing friends and a few days of relaxation before I prepare for my biggest adventure ever happening later in July.

  • Later this month (July 2016), I’m leading a group of future adventurers (my nephews and nieces) along with a few friends transit style to spectacular spots in northern Michigan.
  • Immediately afterwards, three lucky friends are joining me on a special road rally challenge across the Eastern half of the United States.
  • THEN, I’m off to New Zealand where I will road trip through the North Island for two weeks. All of this driving will kick off the start of my Quest to the Seven Continents!

I drove here all the way from Detroit, Michigan, about ten hours or so, to prepare myself for all the driving around I’m about to do in July and especially August.

Route from Detroit, MI to Long Beach, NY.
Route from Detroit, MI to Long Beach, NY.

If I can maneuver through Manhattan and Brooklyn during rush hour, I think I’ll be okay everywhere else (save for New Zealanders driving on the opposite side of the road.) I’ll deal with that part later.

Long Beach, New York

Nicknamed The City By The Sea, Long Beach is a small island stretch just south of Long Island. It’s the perfect place to getaway from the city and if you’re into the bar scene, there are tons here along with a variety of beach side restaurants to divulge in including one of my favorites, the Beach Bagel and Deli. The bars are cool but I’m more about the food, and the Beach Bagel and Deli has monster bagels and sandwiches with my name written on all of them!

Beach Bagel and Deli in Long Island New York

I ordered the Everybody’s Gone Surfin’ specialty sandwich. It’s a chicken filet cuddled with Swiss and Munster cheese, heated up to create a hot gooey delicious mess of a sandwich. I took it back to Tim’s apartment on the beach and devoured it whole! That delicious sandwich set the tone for the rest of my enjoyable stay, where I was able to catch up with friends who lived in and around the city.

Long Island Rail RoadWe took a train from Long Beach to the Penn Station in Manhattan to join a few fellow globetrotter who happened to be around, including Adelah and Emre, who I’ve met prior in Guatemala and Nepal, respectively. It was a night of smooth beers, nachos, and walking into random spots we had no business being in like this psychedelic trance trip going on somewhere in the Alphabet City.

Kelly, another good friend of mine who I climbed a mountain for in South Africa, also made an appearance.

New York with Kelly!

I was able to convince some of them to come over to Long Beach the next day for a getaway at the beach away from all the busy. It really is a neat place to just hangout, minus avoiding the hordes of meatheads all over the main street at night. Besides that, the beach takes the cake!

Long Beach New York Horseshoe Crab

The drive back home was easier than the initial drive to New York. I was able to enjoy all of my outlandish music no one else would dare listen to on blast as I drove through the Poconos of Pennsylvania.

I have a gargantuan trip coming up soon. It’s entirely custom-made to fit my adventurous, super unorthodox, and mostly unplanned style of traveling and I can’t wait to tell you all about it!

 

Hangin' Out In Long Beach, NY: Preparing For A Global Expedition

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Hello world!

I’m writing this at a friend’s apartment right on the oceanfront of Long Beach, New York. It’s the perfect spot to settle and unwind away from the busier neighboring Burroughs of Brooklyn and Manhattan. I’m here for the simple reason of seeing friends and a few days of relaxation before I prepare for my biggest adventure ever happening later in July.

  • Later this month (July 2016), I’m leading a group of future adventurers (my nephews and nieces) along with a few friends transit style to spectacular spots in northern Michigan.
  • Immediately afterwards, three lucky friends are joining me on a special road rally challenge across the Eastern half of the United States.
  • THEN, I’m off to New Zealand where I will road trip through the North Island for two weeks. All of this driving will kick off the start of my Quest to the Seven Continents!

I drove here all the way from Detroit, Michigan, about ten hours or so, to prepare myself for all the driving around I’m about to do in July and especially August.

Route from Detroit, MI to Long Beach, NY.
Route from Detroit, MI to Long Beach, NY.

If I can maneuver through Manhattan and Brooklyn during rush hour, I think I’ll be okay everywhere else (save for New Zealanders driving on the opposite side of the road.) I’ll deal with that part later.

Long Beach, New York

Nicknamed The City By The Sea, Long Beach is a small island stretch just south of Long Island. It’s the perfect place to getaway from the city and if you’re into the bar scene, there are tons here along with a variety of beach side restaurants to divulge in including one of my favorites, the Beach Bagel and Deli. The bars are cool but I’m more about the food, and the Beach Bagel and Deli has monster bagels and sandwiches with my name written on all of them!

Beach Bagel and Deli in Long Island New York

I ordered the Everybody’s Gone Surfin’ specialty sandwich. It’s a chicken filet cuddled with Swiss and Munster cheese, heated up to create a hot gooey delicious mess of a sandwich. I took it back to Tim’s apartment on the beach and devoured it whole! That delicious sandwich set the tone for the rest of my enjoyable stay, where I was able to catch up with friends who lived in and around the city.

Long Island Rail RoadWe took a train from Long Beach to the Penn Station in Manhattan to join a few fellow globetrotter who happened to be around, including Adelah and Emre, who I’ve met prior in Guatemala and Nepal, respectively. It was a night of smooth beers, nachos, and walking into random spots we had no business being in like this psychedelic trance trip going on somewhere in the Alphabet City.

Kelly, another good friend of mine who I climbed a mountain for in South Africa, also made an appearance.

New York with Kelly!

I was able to convince some of them to come over to Long Beach the next day for a getaway at the beach away from all the busy. It really is a neat place to just hangout, minus avoiding the hordes of meatheads all over the main street at night. Besides that, the beach takes the cake!

Long Beach New York Horseshoe Crab

The drive back home was easier than the initial drive to New York. I was able to enjoy all of my outlandish music no one else would dare listen to on blast as I drove through the Poconos of Pennsylvania.

I have a gargantuan trip coming up soon. It’s entirely custom-made to fit my adventurous, super unorthodox, and mostly unplanned style of traveling and I can’t wait to tell you all about it!